News

Wed
11
Sep

Search warrant reveals meth lab in Ossian

Search warrant reveals meth lab in Ossian

 

Search warrant reveals meth lab in Ossian

At 11:13 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, the Winneshiek County Sheriff’s Office executed a meth lab search warrant at 119 W. Main Street in Ossian. During the search of the residence, evidence indicated that Kistina Reinsvold, 35, of Ossian and Brian Brainard, 33, of Lansing had been manufacturing methamphetamine.

Due to the nature of evidence found, precautions were taken and law enforcement was required to dress in full protective geat with SCBA equipment.

Following the search warrant, the Ossian Fire Department assisted law enforcement with the decontamination process.

Reinsvold and Brainard were transported to the Winneshiek County Jail and charged with manufacturing of methamphetamine, possession of precursor ammonia nitrate with intent to manufacture, and possession of controlled substance (methamphetamine) 3rd or subsequent.

Wed
11
Sep

Saying thank you the best way he knows how

LaVerne and Julie Anderson of Ossian are saying ‘thank you’ the best way they know how on Saturday, Sept. 21, when they host Andyland Fun Day at their home (1732 160th Street). The event is LaVerne’s way of thanking the community and the families of those who have supported him as he battles cancer. The day will feature dozens of kids’ games, including the pig train and much more. (Zakary Kriener photo)

 

Saying thank you the best way he knows how

 

Zakary Kriener

News Writer
zkriener@fayettepublishing.com

 

 

For well-known Ossian man LaVerne Anderson, the past year of his life has been a bit of a rollercoaster. After being diagnosed with cancer last November, Anderson has faced an onslaught of ups and downs over the past 10 months. Despite the challenges, he and his wife Julie are planning a day of fun this fall to thank those who have supported him.

“Everything started when I went to the dentist in November of last year for a routine checkup,” said Anderson. “My hygienist felt a lump in my neck and suggested that I get it looked at.”

Two days later, LaVerne and Julie made the trip to La Crosse, Wis., where he was diagnosed with neck cancer.

“My team of doctors put together a plan that would include radiation five days per week and one day of chemo,” explained Anderson, a longtime maintenance worker at Ossian Senior Hospice. “We felt confident with the plan and continued to treat it through the early part of this year.”

Following his radiation/chemotherapy regimen, LaVerne underwent a surgery to clean out the area of his neck affected by the cancer, which included the removal of one of his jugular veins.

“At the end of May, we went back for a PET scan,” continued Anderson. “We were excited about the day and thought that I was completely in the clear.”

However, upon receiving the results of the PET scan, LaVerne and Julie learned that there was more cancer in his body.

“They found spots on my hip, in my lungs, on my sternum, and in my arm,” said LaVerne. “They did a bone biopsy and learned that it was the same cancer that was in my neck.”

The Andersons decided to continue LaVerne’s care at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., where he would begin a new treatment that would include chemotherapy and immunotherapy.

“This all began in the middle of June,” he said. “I would get two rounds of chemotherapy and a treatment of immunotherapy once every three weeks. The initial plan is to do six rounds in hopes of slowing down the cancer.”

Through all of his challenges over the past year, one thing that the cancer has not been able to affect is LaVerne’s willingness to help others and provide entertainment for children.

“Through all of this, Julie and I have been overwhelmed by the support from the community,” said LaVerne. “From the day that we found out, we received gift cards, gas cards, food, offers for rides to treatments and other things from people to show their love and support. It has been really overwhelming.”

LaVerne and Julie went on to say that even people who no longer live in the area have reached out to offer their support.

“Through my diagnosis and all of the treatments over the last year, I have not shed one tear,” explained an emotional LaVerne. “But when I think about the support that I have gotten from everyone, that’s when I start to tear up. It’s amazing to realize the generosity of our little community.”

For LaVerne, he quickly realized that the best way to say thank you to the community is to do what he enjoys most.

Wed
11
Sep

Nationally Registered Historic Places of Clermont: Senator Henderson statue

Erected in 1903, the historic Henderson statue depicts David B. Henderson who once served Iowa's 3rd congressional district in the U.S. House, and later served as the house speaker.  (submitted photo) 

 

Nationally Registered Historic Places of Clermont: Senator Henderson statue

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

The David B. Henderson statue was erected by Gov William Larrabee, designed by New York City sculpture John Massey Rhind, and cast by the Henry Bonnard Bronze Company of New York. 

Standing nearly 7 feet 6 inches high, the Henderson statue which originally stood in the center of Mill Street, was dedicated June, 1903 during a reunion of the 12th Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment to which Henderson had belonged. 

Born in Scotland, Henderson emigrated to the United States with his parents to Illinois in 1846. His family soon moved to a farm near Clermont, in the latter 1800’s. Henderson attended school in Clermont, and later Upper Iowa University (UIU) in Fayette.

Wed
11
Sep

Irrigation water rates won't go up in Fayette

Irrigation water rates won't go up in Fayette

 

 

By Jack Swanson
jswanson@fayettecountynewspapers.com

A potential ordinance to double the City of Fayette’s irrigation water costs was left on the table at the last city council meeting, Tuesday, Sept. 3, following discussion by one resident who felt he was being singled out by the proposed increase.

At the previous council meeting it had been purposed that the rates be doubled from the regular rate of irrigation water at $15 for the first 150 cubic feet, to $30. At that time the council approved going ahead with the proposal with the option to change the rates to what they agreed would be appropriate.

Roy and Jean Karlson were at the meeting and expressed their concern about the water rates and told the council they felt they were already paying more than enough.

Wed
11
Sep

Knox Financial Services opening in West Union

Jason and Amber Knox are excited about the recent opening of Knox Financial Services, LLC at 309 Hwy. 150 N., West Union. They look forward to serving their West Union area clients at their new location, but will continue to divide their time between their two offices in Decorah ad West Union. (Megan Molseed photo)

 

Knox Financial Services opening in West Union

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

“We are very excited to be here in West Union,” smiled Jason Knox of Knox Financial Services of opening a new office right here in West Union.  “It’s been something that has been on our minds for some time and once we found this perfect space, we knew it was time to finally get it going!” 

Since 2016, Knox and his wife, Amber have been serving the area through their Decorah office, a business they are proud to keep expanding.

“Decorah is a good fit for our business, but obviously Amber and I have an interest in developing a presence here in West Union too,” said Knox.  “I’m excited to say we are officially open for business at the new offices!” 

Wed
11
Sep

NFV Supt. announces he will retire after this year

Duane Willhite, NFV Superintendent

 

NFV Supt. announces he will retire after this year

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

North Fayette Valley Superintendent Duane Willhite announced at the School Board meeting Monday night, Sept. 9, that this would be his last year at the school.

Willhite said he would be retiring as of June 30, 2020. He has been with the NFV District for the last 10 years.

He was a teacher for 14 years and a school administrator for 25 years in six different school districts.

Wed
11
Sep

Some opposition flairs up at meeting explaining $5 million bond for road repair

Some opposition flairs up at meeting explaining $5 million bond for road repair

 

By Jack Swanson
jswanson@fayettecountynewspapers.com

 

There was only a handful of people who attended a special presentation by Fayette County explaining why the board of supervisors and the county engineer believe a $5 million bond is needed for future road repairs, but one of those people objected strongly to the plan.

The informational meeting was held at the Opera House in Fayette Thursday night, Sept. 5. The Supervisors and Engineer Joel Fantz gave a presentation that included a handout sheet with photos of road conditions and several graphs and tables outlining where tax dollars are going to today and how they have been spent in the past. 

Some of the information showed projected tax rates if the $5 million bond would be approved.

“Why do you want to borrow money and have to pay interest,” asked Tim O’Brien or rural Fayette, suggesting that taxes be increased to pay for the road repairs instead of borrowing the money.

“We can’t raise taxes that much that fast,” replied Fantz

Wed
04
Sep

#Landon Strong

Landon Hageman’s most recent procedure (Aug. 22) was just one of many that the 2-year-old has undergone so far in his young life. Hageman has experienced health issues since he was born, but was only recently diagnosed with congenital central lymphatic absence of the pelvis/abdomen. The case is the only one known in the world by Mayo Clinic, one of the world’s largest hospitals. (submitted photo)

 

#Landon Strong

 

Zakary Kriener

News Writer
zkriener@fayettepublishing.com

 

 

Muhammad Ali, Chuck Liddell, Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Georges St. Pierre – they are all known as some of the best fighters to grace the earth. While they are certainly some of the best to ever step foot in a ring or octagon, allow me to introduce you to one fighter who perhaps has more fight than all of them combined – young Landon Hageman of rural West Union.

From the moment Landon, now 2-years-old, first came into this world, he has faced an up hill battle. After battling health issues throughout his entire life, Hageman was finally diagnosed with a series of conditions, including congenital central lymphatic absence of the pelvis/abdomen, congenital lymphedema, pulmonary lymphangiectasia, intestinal lymphangiectasie, protein losing entropathym and several others. The combination of conditions is so rare, that Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., has never heard of such a case.

“It is all just as scary as it sounds,” explained Landon’s mother, Liz (Koester). “There is no where for lymph fluid to go and nothing is regulating his lymphatics in the center of his body. Mayo reached out to Boston and CHOP (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia) as they found Landon to be an interesting case. One thing that I’ve been told is that you don’t want to become an interesting case at Mayo.”

Wed
04
Sep

Clermont holds eight historic landmarks

Nestled within the valley along the Turkey River and surrounded by stunning northeast Iowa hills, Clermont earned its unique nickname from the bricks that were made from the area’s native clay in the local brickyard many years ago. Many of Clermont’s homes and businesses are made from these impressive bricks, thus Clermont’s nickname, “Brick City.” 

 

Clermont holds eight historic landmarks

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

Known as the “Brick City,” Clermont remains one of northeast Iowa’s most historic towns.  Established in 1856, and first incorporated as a town on August 16, 1875, the picturesque northeast Iowa town boasts a rich and remarkable history.  

Nestled within the valley along the Turkey River, surrounded by the extraordinary hills of northeast Iowa, Clermont earned its unique nickname from the bricks that were made from the area’s native clay in the local brickyard for well over 75 years.  

Many of the homes and businesses throughout the picturesque Fayette County town were made from these impressive bricks, creating a literal city made of bricks as nearly every building along the town’s main street boasts a brick facade.

Wed
04
Sep

Ice age fossil discovered along the Turkey

Known for their ridges, this mammoth tooth measures at almost exactly 14 inches long.  The biggest wooly mammoth tooth discovered to date measures at 15 inches.  (Megan Molseed photo) 

 

Ice age fossil discovered along the Turkey

 

By Meagan Molseed
mmolseed@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

It was just like any normal day for Elgin native Jeff Miller as he set off floating on the water, looking for interesting finds.

“I was just kayaking on the river, looking for fossils and agates,” Miller said sort of nonchalantly as he sat at the bank of the Turkey River preparing his fishing pole.  “I am always looking around for something, mostly agates.” 

While there were no agates for the outdoor enthusiast to find that day, what he did discover is something beyond anything he could have imagined.

“I glanced over and I saw all the lines and ridges,” he said.  “I got closer to it, thinking it looked like a rib cage or something.” 

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